What we know, and don’t know, about Atlantic hurricane season

Normal

No hurricane has made landfall in the United States in any season since 2011. A near-normal hurricane season would bring one to four named storms, including two to four hurricanes.

Historical information: NOAA’s recent hurricane season outlook predicts the 21st hurricane season to bring an above-normal number of storms and a near-normal number of hurricanes. A near-normal season would bring one to three named storms, including two to four hurricanes.

Rain

Historically, summer months have become more active in the Atlantic Ocean. The United States has not experienced more than two hurricanes in a June-through-August period since 1988. That’s a 20-year stretch.

The last time a storm made landfall in the United States during the June-through-August period was 2011, when Tropical Storm Julia made landfall on North Carolina’s Outer Banks as a hurricane.

Months are responsible for heavy rainfall across the U.S. This is the case throughout the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean. Heavy rainfall has caused life-threatening flooding and major flooding across much of the continental United States and Puerto Rico. Some areas have witnessed as much as 13 inches of rain.

Rainfall totals through mid-July in the tropics have averaged 3.5 inches in the Atlantic, 3.4 inches in the Caribbean and 5.4 inches in the Gulf of Mexico.

Odds of a storm making landfall in the United States during the month of August? Below 5 percent.

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